2015 Job Outlook for Teens


There’s reason to be hopeful.  It’s better than last year, says Teens4Hire.org

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HUNTINGTON BEACH, CA- Recent reports show the US jobless rate is at its lowest point since Sept 2008.  There’s little doubt our economy is on the rebound.  Companies have increased hiring.  We’re hopeful this means the growing possibility of new job openings this summer that teens could fill and the willingness of companies to hire self-motivated ambitious teens to fill them, says Teens4Hire.org. 

RenĂ©e Ward, founder of Teens4Hire® and an advocate for teen employment says, “Teens who want to work shouldn’t listen to the naysayers this summer.  Some older adults even think teens don’t want jobs.  I know it’s been tough but now’s the time to get prepared, get out of the house and go after the jobs a teen could fill.” 

She adds, “Teens don’t be shy about approaching companies in person.  If you can demonstrate a positive attitude and the eagerness to learn, you’ll motivate people to hire you.” 

For the past decade, statistics show 3 out of 4 teens who wanted to work could not land jobs. They were stymied by a lackluster job market and having to compete with older adults who were willing to accept the type of jobs traditionally held by teens, as well as, the same rate of pay. 

Another bit of good news is the rise in the stock market has helped older workers near or at retirement age to see a nice increase in their 401k plans which gives many seniors the opportunity to bypass taking low wage part-time positions (traditionally held by teens) solely for needed income. 

As always, experience will trump inexperience.  Adult teens (18-19) have an advantage over minor teens (14-17) in getting a job.  That’s because older teens may be more mature, have prepped themselves better and/or already have some work experience. 

Overall, businesses complain that teens are not prepared to work and don’t have the means or inclination to train young adults in work place fundamentals.  To address this need, Teens4Hire.org offers a premium membership option that includes a package of services designed to get teens ready for the workplace, certified and prepared to compete for openings. 

Ward says, “Parents should make this small investment (a one-time fee of $39) to “develop job readiness” in their teenager.  It gives teens an edge in overcoming employer reluctance in hiring, has credible results and provides a work ethic foundation that lasts a lifetime.” 

In addition to the free resources the site provides, it has a new interview series, “My First Job”, profiling the first job stories of successful people.  Teens seeking work can get tips that they can use today from these interviews. 

Internships (paid and nonpaid) are proliferating.  Young adults can find openings in a plethora of industries from computer technology to fashion.   Traditional summer jobs in quick service restaurant/casual dining, leisure/hospitality, and retail are also available. 

Teens4Hire.org polls show that 80% of teens 14-19 want paying jobs. Teens crave paid work-based learning experiences such as internships, co-ops and apprenticeships that make education relevant and interesting and let them explore career options. But for pay, teens are willing to work as housekeepers and gardeners too. 

Teens need the income for necessities such as school supplies, transportation, phones, clothing, college tuition and in many cases to help support their entire family. 

Ward says, “We catch young people at the moment “they” feel they are ready to work. It is at this time that young people make critical choices that affect their transition into adulthood and shape their perceptions about the world of work.  Work experience at this stage in life is critical, and people who spend a large share of their young adult years unemployed have a hard time finding and keeping a job later in life.” 

As a quick reference, check out:
Get Ready for the Workplace
Top 10 Tips to Land a Job
Top 10 Tips on How to Write a Resume
Job Titles/Positions Suitable for Teens
Best Things to Do if You Can’t Land a Job 
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Officially launched February 15, 2002, Teens4Hire.org is the #1 resource for recruiting the U.S. high school and college age group online. Find eager-to-work young adult candidates today! 

No one will “give” you a job. You have to earn one.

Summer is in full swing and we have been bombarded with phone calls and emails from teens who—want Teens4Hire.org to “GIVE” them a paying job.

This may sound silly to some of you. Unfortunately for others they are serious. For those of you in the later category, I hate to break this to you but Teens4Hire.org does NOT give out jobs. In fact, no one does!

You have to EARN a job.

You earn a job by first preparing yourself for employment. By 14 years of age you should know how to:

Read with understanding,
Communicate with good grammar verbally in English and in writing,
Do basic math accurately (add, subtract, multiply and divide),
Take and follow directions,
Get along with others.

Beyond that, you should have some sense of what you ‘can’ do as well as what you would ‘like’ to do.

Once you have some idea of what you can and would like to do, identify places in your immediate neighborhood where you’d want to work.

Be realistic. If you don’t have a car or public transportation, don’t consider a job that may require this. If the minimum age requirement is 18—don’t bother trying if you are younger. By the way, how do you find out what the minimum age is? Ask! Call them up or walk in the door and ask. It’s that simple.

Be creative. Think of all the places in your local area where you’d fit in. For example, if you like animals perhaps you could work at a pet store, zoo, grooming salon, animal shelter, or start a business walking dogs or cleaning up after them.

Employers want to hire people who can do the job they need getting done.

You have to dress in appropriate business attire. You have to complete an application correctly. You have to speak in your business voice when interviewing. You have to make eye contact with the interviewer. You have to share information about yourself to the interviewer that demonstrates you can do the job (or in some cases learn to do the job) BEFORE you can earn the job.

Once you land a job, and in return for your services, you get paid—either with money and/or experience.

Remember, no one will give you a job. You have to earn one.

Jobs for Teens in Fast Food, Casual Dining, Ice Cream and Juice Chains

Teens4Hire.org's Editorially Selected Places That Traditionally Hire Teens for Jobs among Fast Food, Casual Dining Restaurant, Ice Cream and Juice Chains;

Fast Food Chains

Subway
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.subway.com/subwayroot/AboutSubway/Employment/index.aspx

McDonald’s
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.mcdonalds.com/usa/work.html

Sonic
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.sonicdrivein.com/business/careers/index.jsp

Pizza Hut
Minimum age for employment: 16
http://www.pizzahut.com/Careers/

Taco Bell
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.tacobell.com/careers/

Burger King
Minimum age for employment: 16
http://www.bk.com/CompanyInfo/careers.aspx

Wendy’s
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.wendys.com/careers/index.jsp

Arby’s
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.arbys.com/careers/

Dominos Pizza
Minimum age for employment: Generally 18+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.dominosbiz.com/Biz-Public-EN/Site+Content/Secondary/Careers/

In-N-Out Burger
Starting wage: $10/hr
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, depending upon location.
http://www.in-n-out.com/employment.asp

Papa John’s Pizza
Minimum age for employment: 16+

http://company.papajohns.com/careers/index.shtm

KFC
Minimum age for employment: 16+
http://www.jobswithkfc.com/#/home

Carl’s Jr.
Minimum age for employment: 16+
http://www.carlsjr.com/jobs/

Cousins Subs
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.cousinssubs.com/employment/

Jack in the Box
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.jackinthebox.com/corporate/careers/why-jack/

WhataBurger
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location. About 700 US locations in 10 states.
http://www.whataburger.com/join_the_family.php

TacoTime
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.tacotime.com/about/our_team.html

Blimpie
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.blimpie.com/employment.html

Quizno’s
Minimum age for employment: 16+
http://www.quiznos.com/subsandwiches/CareersTemplate.aspx?page=index.html

Long John Silver’s
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.ljsilvers.com/careers/

White Castle
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://whitecastle.hodesiq.com/default.asp

Casual Dining Restaurants

Darden Restaurants (Red Lobster, Olive Garden, LongHorn Steakhouse, Seasons52, Capital Grille, and Bahama Breeze)
Minimum age for employment: Generally 18+
http://www.darden.com/careers.asp

Applebee’s
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+
http://www.applebees.com/WorkWithUs.aspx

Brinker International Restaurants (Chili’s, Maggiano’s, On the Border,
Macaroni Grill)
Minimum age for employment: Generally 18+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.brinker.com/

TGI Fridays
Minimum age for employment: Generally 18+
https://www.tgifridays.com/jobs/Index.aspx

Ruby Tuesday
Minimum age for employment: Generally 18+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.rubytuesday.com/careers.asp

Outback Steakhouse
Minimum age for employment: Generally 18+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.outback.com/careeropportunities/index.aspx

Ice Cream and Juice Chains

Cold Stone Creamery
Minimum age for employment: Generally 16+, sometimes lower depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.coldstonecreamery.com/jobs/best_jobs.html

Ben&Jerry’s
Minimum age for employment: Generally 14+, depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.benjerry.com/company/jobs/

Baskin Robbins
Minimum age for employment: Generally 14+, depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.baskinrobbins.com/About/Employment.aspx

Dairy Queen
Minimum age for employment: Generally 14+, depending upon franchisee and location.
http://www.dairyqueen.com/us-en/careers/